Part Two preparation

Part Two preparation

I feel that the standard applied at part two is not really high enough and as such allows people through the test that are not really as fully developed as they might be. More advanced driving techniques to fully develop a thinking driver is my ideal where possible. We must help to unlock the individuals potential to enable them to become the best version of themselves it is possible to be.

I find that once they have discovered commentary driving they go away and self develop. I instigate this by asking questions about what they see ahead, what they cannot see, and what they might reasonably expect in the circumstances they find themselves in. The switch to commentary driving becomes a natural extension of this and is to be encouraged. It can save lots of training time too, which may be better utilised later. It also means that those who would traditionally be more challenging to train can develop plans with me to develop their driving every time they drive. Ownership of the process is key here and also exposes the to the coaching/client centred approaches they will be utilising later in their development.

Developing really good forward planning and commentary skills can be most beneficial for a working driving instructor. These are techniques used in the world of advanced driving and most useful to a student instructor developing their driving. There are aspects of advanced driving that do not meet with approval by the DVSA such as straight lining roundabouts and shifting position on approach to bends in every circumstance, so we need to be mindful of this.

Utilising this approach I feel means we are no longer training them to a standard (part two exam) although this standard needs to be met of course, but rather developing a thinking driver alert to, anticipating and adapting to the world around them in a much more pro-active way.

I feel that this is important as the standard required at Part Two is not really that high, and as such, allows people through the test that are not as fully developed as they might be. We have traditionally focused solely on the part two standard, and stived to reach it. Some of us have striven to help others reach beyond that standard, however the fact remains that we are shackled to the standard. If we strive to reach beyond it and develop beyond it, it means if they have a bad day on test, they may be more likely to still pass. We again, have a unique opportunity to develop the individual and to influence their ability to self-coach.

But what if they have barriers to being coached and want you to tell them what to do?

Well, if we have done a good job when we set the scene at the start you should have less resistance, but there still may be some who see you as the expert and want you to perform an assessment on them. this is to be avoided wherever possible as this means they are taking less ownership, so how do we get rid of these barriers to taking ownership of their own learning?

We often get the “I don’t know” answer to our question “what do you want to do today?” at the start of part two training This often leads to us taking control of things and instructing. We must try to avoid this and to do that I find it best to talk about what they might do if a learner said I do not know when they asked them what they wanted to do today, what might their options be?

Well to enable breakdown of barriers they might offer options and get the learner to choose one, or they might ask “if there was only one thing you could fix, what would it be?”

Then the discussion would turn back to them and how that might apply when you ask them. In this action you are passing the leadership ball to them, and they are learning how to take a more active role in the process which will result in much better outcomes.

I would prefer that we teach/encourage more advanced driving techniques to fully develop the coachee into a thinking driver. We must help to unlock the individual’s potential to enable them to become the best version of themselves it is possible to be. I find that once they have discovered commentary driving, they go away and continue their own development. I instigate this by asking questions about what they see ahead, what they cannot see, and what they might reasonably expect in the circumstances they find themselves in. The switch to commentary driving becomes a natural extension of this and is to be encouraged. It can save lots of training time too, which may be better utilised later. It also means that those who would traditionally be more challenging to train can create plans to advance their driving every time they drive and not just when they are with me. Ownership of the process is key here and exposes them to the coaching and client-centred approaches that they will be utilising later in their training.

Developing higher-level forward planning and commentary skills can be most beneficial for a working driving instructor. However they are a bit scared of it and reluctant to engage, so I tend to simply ask questions about stuff that is in the far distance and start a conversation about how we might deal with it (for example, what colour are those traffic lights?) this is starting commentary driving but without introducing it as a topic, they very quickly switch to doing it before you ask, because it’s a fun game to play!!

The commentary driving techniques used in the world of advanced driving and can be most useful to a coachee instructor developing their driving. However, there are aspects of advanced driving that do not meet with approval by the DVSA, such as straight-lining roundabouts and shifting position on approach to bends in every circumstance, so we need to be mindful of this.

I feel that utilising this approach means we are no longer training them to the standard of the Part Two exam (although of course this standard needs to be met), but rather developing a thinking driver who is alert, anticipating and adapting to the world around them in a much more proactive way and as such gains a level of driving well above the standard required at Part Two exam by the DVSA. The examiner will tell your PDI at the start of Part Two test “this is a test of an extremely high standard” This unfortunately is not true when we compare it with the Advanced driving tests, where a much higher level of observation and planning is required to reach the standard.

My preferred methodology is to start with a Q&A session to get to know them, if I am starting their training at this stage (can be common) This is a much better and more human way to deal with things and especially if we wish the coachees to take ownership of the learning and become client-centred themselves once they are working instructors. We must set a good example and demonstrate how we expect them to conduct themselves with their own coachees.

I believe that it is vital to create and maintain the equal relationship and this starts with a blank sheet and builds from there. The conversation “where are you now?” and “what do you hope to get out of these initial sessions?” is the starting point. Then there might be broader questions around timescales. “How do you best learn” is one of the best questions you can ask. Get the info from the horse’s mouth. It is here that any barriers to ownership might surface and the development of techniques to beginning the breakdown of such barriers.

Explain that this process is part of you wanting to get to know more about them, you are investing time and effort into this and them, and they will feel better about it.

We must then, based on their ideas, if safe, help them to develop a plan of how to tackle things. They may seem passive and want to be told what to do, but nobody really wants that. The Client centred learning Tutor/Coach workshop will give you help and guidance as to how to structure conversations to overcome barriers and gain engagement, and ultimately ownership. This is their opportunity to write reflections and plans in the workbook in the same way as they would require of their learners. We have the opportunity at this point to relate what we have done with them to the marking form for their part three exam and show how you as the trainer have identified their goals and needs, and how together you have put in place a workable plan. This covers not only the first two rows of the marking sheet, but also cuts across to teaching and learning styles. Take some time at this point to discuss these things.

Avoid assessment drives, if possible, this only creates a hierarchy and gets in the way of coachee ownership. The only time it would really be acceptable to do this would be if it were truly what the coachee wanted, and I am confident that a conversation about what they hoped to gain from it might help develop a plan where they are more actively involved. There are many techniques to creating scenarios where this is possible, and too many to list here. The workshops will help you to develop these skills.

The methodology of old where we deconstructed them (assessment drives and first Part Three sessions where we utilised role-play, which inevitably scared them half to death) and then reformed them in an image we decided was right is dead.

This methodology can create a God complex in potential tutors, believing that the only way to do it is their way, and again this can stifle human development as it immediately places the learner in passive mode.

The role of the old Part Two Tutor/Coach placed that Tutor/Coach at the centre of everything when it needs to be the coachee. Tutor/Coaches (in some cases) are a little reluctant to give up this hierarchy as they perhaps feel it devalues them or their role.

We must help the coachee to evolve into the best version of them it is possible to be. This is very different from the core comps methodology you learned previously, which is massively flawed in terms of having learning take place as it limits and slows progress, it is learning by rote, and the rest of the educational world left those methods behind more than two decades ago.

There are those who resist being coached, as they have barriers, some of which they have carried for a long time and have become deep rooted. It is the role of the tutor/coach to help the coachee break through these barriers, not by insisting that is what happens, but by showing them that there is nothing to be feared in it. We do this by creating the right relationship and environment. Nobody really truly wants to be told what to do if there is an option that helps them self-develop in the absence of judgement and where fear of failure is minimised. Even someone who is predisposed through life experiences can be helped to break these barriers down in terms of driver training. They need to see themselves as entrepreneurs not employees. After all they will shortly be running their own businesses.

During this phase of their training, they will develop their abilities as well as their belief in self-development; it is the cornerstone of coaching and will set the scene for later training. We can, if we structure things properly, have them teach themselves once they get comfortable with the relationship, and this in turn develops powerful conversations that allow the dots to be joined up inside their head, utilising what they already know.

It will prove fruitful to place the coachee in the role of instructor to deal with any areas that are identified as requiring development in their driving. Ask them to imagine they were now a qualified ADI and working at the pointy end and have a learner who has the same issue.

You will help them to identify how they will convey to the learner why it is a bad idea to drive that way and what the consequences of that kind of driving might be.

You would then help them to think about how they might go about convincing the learner about the need for behavioural change if they were adamant that the way they did it was OK.

In this action we have addressed the see it, say it, and suss it part of the Part Three competencies assessed at part three.

You would then move on to have them identify exercises and locations that would prove useful in structuring experiences for development in this area of driver development. There is an opportunity at this point to discuss the route you have chosen and have them look at what the good points or negative points of this route might be. This can lead to very fruitful discussions about how we often must compromise because of the area we find ourselves in and the practicalities and time constraints. Also take the time at this point to ask them where you may go if they need to move to more advanced things, or indeed do remedial. Have a map of the area with you sand use this time to develop their ability to think for themselves about such matters and develop good routes for their learners. All based on reflection of the scenario you created.

The risk management section of the form should be tackled in the same way, setting up the scenarios for them and then having them reflect on how they might do this in the real world with a variety of different coachees with a variety of different barriers and obstacles in the way of their development.

What we have done, in essence is teach them how to self-coach, and to understand what is required of them on their part three test and into the world beyond that, and by doing so the training at Part Three should take less time and be more meaningful and fruitful for you both. This is the role of the modern tutor.